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Teknologi Informasi

Fedora Core 4 Install

Posted by intrik on April 26, 2007

These instructions assume an i386 to i686 system (32 bit) with, an “always on” LAN or broadband connection configured “DHCP” and at least 10 GB of free disk space for the Fedora partition. Instructions for dual booting Windows and Fedora are included.

For x86_64 processors (64-bit AMD64, EM64T) you should probably get FC4-x86_64-disc1.iso, FC4-x86_64-disc2.iso, FC4-x86_64-disc3.iso, and FC4-x86_64-disc4.iso. These instructions will not strictly apply for 64 bit computers using the 64 bit isos. 64 bit capable processors like Athlon 64, Opteron and Xeon are supposed to be backwardly compatible with 32 bit instruction sets and are known to run 32 bit editions of Linux. Therefore the i386 isos may work with these. I understand that Fedora Core for 64 bit processors still has some unresolved issues. Your mileage may vary.

Contents:

Installation
Configuring your monitor
A warning about mixing repositories
Yum
Apt and Synaptic
Firefox and Thunderbird
nVidia and ATI graphics acceleration
True Type fonts
Fedora Extras
Yum Extender
Java
Flash
RealPlayer
Rhythmbox
Adobe Reader
Xine – a DVD and multimedia player
Totem-xine – the Totem front end for Xine
MPlayer – another multimedia player
XMMS – a music and MP3 player
Beep – another media player
VLC – the Videolan stand-alone media player
Amarok – a KDE multimedia player
NTFS support
Bittorrent and bittorrent-gui
Azureus for bittorrent
LimeWire – a Java P2P application
Web Server
FTP Server
PHP and Perl
MySQL
phpMyAdmin
Resources
The Red Hat by Madalina Iordache

“The Red Hat” by Madalina Iordache
(used with permission)

Installation:

  • The following guide outlines the author’s personal installation preferences including instructions for installing third party software that is not available from the Fedora Project. Formal Fedora Core documentation is available at http://fedora.redhat.com/docs/ and should be consulted for detailed explanations of all formally supported installation options including the rationale behind each.
  • Download and burn the five Fedora Core 4 CDs from iso images or the DVD iso image from your nearest mirror site. (You should get FC4-i386-disc1.iso, FC4-i386-disc2.iso, FC4-i386-disc3.iso, FC4-i386-disc4.iso and FC4-i386-rescuecd.iso.) The CD iso images or the DVD iso image are also available using bittorrent.
  • Partition your hard disk with something like one of the disk partition creation/editing tools on the System Rescue CD available at http://www.sysresccd.org/. You could also use a commercial product such as PartitionMagic. You may leave the partition that you wish to use for Fedora as unformatted space. The installation program will format this partition, create swap space within it, and make a directory structure.
  • Configure your bios settings to boot first from the CD drive.
  • Insert the first Fedora Core 4 CD or the DVD and reboot your machine.
  • At the “boot” prompt hit enter.
  • Hit enter for “ok” and enter again for “Test” to test your CD or DVD media or the right arrow key to select the “Continue” box and hit enter to skip this test. (I recommend testing your media to determine if your CDs or DVDs are properly burned.) If your media passes you will be given an opportunity to check additional CDs or DVDs. When you are finished testing hit enter for “ok”, right arrow to the “Continue” box and hit enter to continue.
  • When Anaconda, the Fedora Core installer loads click “Next” at the “Welcome…” page.
  • Click “Next” at the “Language Selection” page for default English or select your language.
  • Click “Next” at the “Keyboard Configuration” page for default U. S. English or select your language.
  • Select the type of installation that you feel suits your needs on the “Installation Type” page. Regardless of your choice you will have the opportunity to upgrade or downgrade to “Personal Desktop”, “Workstation”, “Server” or “Custom” after your initial installation with the “system-config-packages” application. Your initial choice is by no means final. Fedora Core is very flexible in this regard. Click “Next”.
  • Select “automatically partition” on the “Disk Partitioning Setup” page. Click “Next”. If you elect to manually edit your partition with Disk Druid, double click on the partition, select the “swap” file type, and configure your swap space size to equal about twice your computer’s physical memory size. Double click on the remainder of the partition to configure it as a Linux ext3 file system. At minimum you must designate this remaining space (probably /dev/hda2 or /dev/sda2) as the root “/” partition mount point.
  • If you are going to dual boot Windows and Fedora and you already have Windows installed on another partition select “keep all partitions and use existing free space” on the “Automatic Partitioning” page. Otherwise select “Remove all partitions on this system” to use all of your hard disk for Fedora or choose “Remove all Linux partitions on this system” for a fresh install over any existing Linux partitions. Click “Next”.
  • Click “Next” on the “Disk Setup” page.
  • If you are dual booting Windows and Fedora Check the “other” check box on the “Boot Loader Configuration” page. Click “edit”. Type “Windows” in the “label” box and uncheck the “default boot target” check box. Click “ok”.
  • Click the “default” check box next to “Fedora Core” to make it your default boot operating system. Click “Next”.
  • Leave “eth0” and hostname “automatically via DHCP” on the “Network Configuration” page. Click “Next”.
  • Leave “Enable firewall” selected on the “Firewall Configuration” page. There is no need to tick the check boxes for “ssh”, “http”, “https”, “ftp” and “smtp” at this time. If you need any of these services after your initial installation you will have the opportunity to select them with the “system-config-securitylevel” application. Leave “Enable SELinux” “active”. Click “Next”.
  • Click on the map for your location on the “Time Zone Selection” page. Click “Next”.
  • Set your preferred root password on the “Set Root Password” page. Click “Next”.
  • Depending on the type of installation you have selected you may next see a “Package Installation Defaults” page. On the “Package Installation Defaults” page you will have an opportunity to customize the software packages to be installed by selecting the radio button for “Customize software packages to be installed” or to leave the default packages selected. If you choose “Install default software packages” you will have an opportunity to customize your software package selections after your initial installation with the “system-config-packages” application. Click “Next”.
  • You will see a message “Reading package information…”.
  • Depending on the type of installation you have selected or if you selected “Customize software packages to be installed” on the “Package Installation Defaults” page you may next see a “Package Group Selection” page. Scroll down through the “Package Group Selection” page and select your preferred groups and packages. You will have an opportunity to modify your software package selections after your initial installation with the “system-config-packages” application. Click “Next”.
  • You will see a message “Checking dependencies…”
  • Click “Next” on “About to Install” page.
  • Click “continue” to get to the “Installing Packages” page. You will see a “Formatting / file system…” message, a “Starting install process…” message, a “Preparing to install…” message, and you will eventually be prompted to insert the remainder of the installation CDs unless you are using the DVD.
  • When the installation is complete remove the last CD or the DVD and click “reboot” for the first boot screen.
  • After Fedora reboots click “Next” on the “Welcome” page.
  • Click the appropriate radio button to agree to the license agreement and Click “Next”.
  • If you are already connected to an “always on” LAN or broadband connection click on the “Network Time Protocol” tab, click in the “Enable Network Time Protocol” check box, click the down arrow in the “Server” box, select “clock.redhat.com” , click “Add” and click “Next”. You will see a message “Contacting NTP Server. Please wait…”.
  • On the “Display” page select your preferred screen resolution and color depth based upon the capabilities of your monitor. If your monitor’s screen resolution is not available in the dialog box or if Fedora did not recognize your monitor or graphics card you will have an opportunity to configure them later. Click “Next”.
  • On the “System User” page choose a user name (in lower case, not “root”), a full name (any case), and a password for that default user. Click “Next”.
  • Click “play test sound” on the “Sound Card” page to test your sound system. You should hear three chords in sequence. If you don’t you can try to configure your sound card later. Click “No” or “Yes” in the “Did you hear the sample sound?” dialog box. Click “Next”.
  • Click “Next” on the “Additional CDs” page.
  • Click “Next” on the “Finish Setup” page.
  • Log in as “root” with the root password you selected earlier.
  • When Fedora finishes booting to the graphical interface you have the option of moving the panels. To try it click on the top panel, hold your left mouse button down, drag the top panel to the bottom of the screen, and release the mouse button. This is my personal preference.
  • Click “Applications” > “System Tools”. Right click on “Terminal” and select “Add this launcher to panel”.
  • Right click on the terminal icon on the bottom panel and select “move”. Move the icon to the left near the other icons and click to position it there.
  • Fedora Core includes the rhgb (Red Hat Graphical Boot) package as well as a “hidden menu” which opens up only if the user hits enter during the initial stage of the boot process and which presents a dialog in which the user can select from multiple operating systems if he has for example opted to dual boot his computer with Fedora Core and Windows. It also allows the operator to select from multiple kernels if they are available. The hidden menu exists to prevent confusion since normally the novice user will want to automatically boot into his default selection choice made during the installation process. The author prefers to disable this feature as well as the graphical boot screens so that the boot sequence which normally happens “behind the scenes” becomes visible and so that the alternate operating system(s) and kernel choices become immediately available. In order to do this be sure you are logged in as root, then click on the terminal icon. This will open the terminal.
  • Type:

    gedit /boot/grub/grub.conf
  • Hit enter and gedit will open. Revise the “hiddenmenu” and “kernel” lines in grub.conf so that your file looks like this:

    # grub.conf generated by anaconda
    #
    # Note that you do not have to rerun grub after making changes to this file
    # NOTICE:  You have a /boot partition.  This means that
    #          all kernel and initrd paths are relative to /boot/, eg.
    #          root (hd0,1)
    #          kernel /vmlinuz-version ro root=/dev/VolGroup00/LogVol00
    #          initrd /initrd-version.img
    #boot=/dev/hda
    default=0
    timeout=5
    splashimage=(hd0,1)/grub/splash.xpm.gz
    #hiddenmenu
    title Fedora Core 4 (2.6.11-1.1369_FC4)
    	root (hd0,0)
    	kernel /vmlinuz-2.6.11-1.1369_FC4 ro root=/dev/VolGroup00/LogVol00 vga=771
    	initrd /initrd-2.6.11-1.1369_FC4.img
    title Windows
    	rootnoverify (hd0,0)
    	chainloader +1

    Disabling the “hiddenmenu” with the “#” comment and removing “rhgb quiet” from the kernel line will cause the operating system selection menu to display immediately upon boot and will also disable the graphical boot screens so that you will see the boot sequence scroll by in text. Click on the “save” icon in gedit and close it. Close the terminal.

  • Click on “Desktop” > “System Settings” > “Server Settings” > “Services” and deselect system services that you will not immediately use. When you click on each of them you will see a description as to what they are for. If you’re not sure, leave them in there. (I deselected “anacron”, “apmd”, “atd”, “bluetooth”, “canna”, “cpuspeed”, “cups”, “cups-config-daemon”, “hpoj”, “mDNSResponder”, “mdmonitor”, “nfslock”, “nifd”, “pcmcia”, “rpcgssd”, “rpcidmapd”, and “sendmail”.) Click the “save” icon. You should also select “Edit Runlevel” on the menu, select “Runlevel 3”, deselect the same system services as you just did for run level 5, and save them as well by clicking the “save” icon. Then close the service configuration screen. (Run level 3 is for text mode only without X windows and we will use this run level later when configuring the nVidia driver.)
  • Fedora Core 4 has an “automatic” log in feature. You should seriously consider whether or not to enable this feature for security reasons. If you would like to enable it click on “Desktop” > “System Settings” > “Login Screen”. Under the “Timed Login” section click on the “Login a user automatically after a specified number of seconds” check box. Type or select your default user name that you selected during installation (lower case, not “root”) in the “Timed login username:” box and type “5” in the “Seconds before login:” box . Click “close”.
  • Click “Desktop” > “Log Out” > “Restart the computer” and click “ok”.
  • After boot up you should be logged in as the default user. Click on the top panel, hold your left mouse button down, drag the top panel to the bottom of the screen, and release the mouse button.
  • Rather than updating my Fedora Core installation with up2date (the flashing red icon in the panel) I prefer to use the update feature of yum which is the preferred application for software updates, dependency resolution, and software installation. In order to do this open a terminal, type “su -“, hit enter, enter your root password, type “rpm –import /usr/share/doc/fedora-release-*/*GPG-KEY*”, hit enter, type “yum -y update”, hit enter, and wait for your installation to update. You should do this immediately after your initial installation to get the most recent Fedora Core software updates and bug fixes. If you prefer to use up2date click the red flashing up2date icon in the lower right. Click “Forward”. Click “Forward”. Click “Forward”. Click “Apply”. Click on the up2date icon in the lower right again. Click on the “Launch up2date…” box. Type in your root password and click “ok”. Click on the “Package Exceptions” tab, click on “kernel*” and click on the “Remove” box. Click “ok” again. Click on “yes” to install the key. Click “Forward”. Click “Forward” again. After the headers are downloaded click on the “select all packages” check box and click “Forward”. You will see a progress dialog “Testing package set / solving RPM dependencies”. Click “Yes” on each instance if you get messages “…not signed with a GPG signature…” When this is complete the updates will be downloaded. (This may take a very long time depending upon your connection speed the first time you run up2date and you may think that your installation has hung but it actually has not. If you don’t have the patience for this import the Fedora key by typing “rpm –import /usr/share/doc/fedora-release-*/*GPG-KEY*” in a terminal as root, hit enter and then do a “yum -y update” as root instead.) Click “Forward” to install the updates and “Forward” again to complete. Click “Finish”. “Click “Close”. Click “Activate” in the Subscription Alert box if it appears, launch up2date, and check for updates again as described above. Click “Desktop” > “Log Out” > “Restart the computer” and click “ok” to reboot.

Configuring your monitor:

  • If Fedora did not recognize your monitor during installation, log in as root. (If you are already logged in as your default user or a user other than root click “Actions” > “Log Out”, click “OK”, type “root” in the “Username:” box, hit enter, type your root password in the “Password:” box and hit enter.) Open a terminal. Alternately you may open a terminal, type, “su -“, hit enter, type your root password when prompted, and hit enter again to log in as root.
  • Type:

    gedit /etc/X11/xorg.conf

    Hit enter and gedit will open. Scroll down to the “Monitor” section. Find the “HorizSync” line and enter your monitor’s supported horizontal frequency range. The line should look something like “HorizSync 30.0 – 70.0”. Enter your monitor’s supported vertical frequency range opposite “VertRefresh”. The line should look something like “VertRefresh 50.0 – 160.0”. Scroll down to the “Screen” section and opposite each instance of “modes” enter you monitor’s supported pixel resolution, starting with the highest. The line should look something like “Modes “1024×768” “800×600” “640×480″”. You should be able to get these values from your monitor’s manual or from a search for your monitor by manufacturer and model number on the Internet. Use caution when entering these values and be sure that they conform to your monitor’s published specifications or you could be left with a non-working graphical environment. Hit the “save” button in gedit and exit gedit. Log out and log back in.

  • Click “Desktop” > “System Settings” > “Display”. Type your root password in the dialog box presented and hit enter. Click the down arrow on the right of the “Resolution:” box and select your preferred pixel resolution. Click the down arrow on the right of the “Color Depth:” box and select your preferred color depth. Click “OK”. Log out and log back in.
  • Click “Desktop” > “Preferences” > “Screen Resolution”. Click the down arrow on the right of the “Resolution:” box and select your preferred pixel resolution. Click the down arrow on the right of the “Refresh rate:” box and select the highest refresh rate available. A refresh rate of 85 Hz or more will decrease noticeable flicker significantly and may eliminate it completely. Click “Apply”. Log out and log back in.

Caution! Special warning regarding mixing incompatible repositories for up2date, yum, and apt:

  • We will be using the program applications Yum, Yumex, Apt, and Synaptic below as methods to obtain software and to update your Fedora Core installation. You will be configuring these programs by adding repositories which are groups of software created by third party packagers that we use in addition to original Fedora Core and Fedora Extras repositories that come standard with your new installation.As you continue please keep the following in mind: You should not use the livna.org repository in conjunction with the dag/freshrpms/dries/newrpms (RPMforge) collection of rpms in your configuration files for automatic updates. Use one group or the other but not both. These two groups are mutually incompatible and can cause errors in your installation if used together for automatic updates. Regardless of which group you choose you should also avoid using the ATrpms repository in your yum or apt configuration files for these reasons. Some additional information can be found here. (If the center of that page comes up empty reload the page.)

    With this being said please note that it is nonetheless possible to obtain single RPM packaged applications from incompatible third party repositories in cases where such packages do not create errors when installed with yum. More specifically it is possible to configure other repositories with their enable flags set to “0” (off) so that the yum “–enablerepo” command must be used when one of those packages is desired. We will do this to obtain the totem-xine package by configuring the livna.org stable repository with its enable flag set to “0” and then enabling it for one download and rpm installation as described in the totem-xine section below.

    I myself subscribe to the RPMforge collection as you can see in my yum and apt repository selection instructions below. The dag/freshrpms/dries/newrpms/PlanetCCRMA (RPMforge) repositories have provided me with all of the programs I have needed as additions to the Fedora base.

    Note that up2date looks in /etc/yum.repos.d/ by default for its repositories so that if you change your yum configuration you will have changed your up2date configuration at the same time.

    To configure your Fedora Core 4 yum and apt repositories to use the RPMForge repositories proceed as follows:

Yum:

  • Open the terminal. Type:

    wget http://ftp.belnet.be/packages/dries.ulyssis.org/fedora/fc4/i386/RPMS.dries/rpmforge-release-0.2-2.2.fc4.rf.i386.rpm

    Hit enter. Wait for the download to complete. Type:

    su

    Hit enter. Type your root password. Hit enter. Type:

    rpm -Uvh *.rpm

    Hit enter. wait for the installation to complete. Type:

    rm *.rpm

    Type “y”. Hit enter. Type:

    su -

    Hit enter. Type:

    gedit /etc/yum.repos.d/freshrpms.repo

    Hit enter and gedit will open. Type the following in gedit:

    [core]
    name=FreshRPMS-Core
    baseurl=http://ayo.freshrpms.net/fedora/linux/$releasever/$basearch/core
    	http://ayo.us5.freshrpms.net/fedora/linux/$releasever/$basearch/core
    failovermethod=priority
    enabled=1
    gpgcheck=1
    [updates]
    name=FreshRPMS-Updates
    baseurl=http://ayo.freshrpms.net/fedora/linux/$releasever/$basearch/updates
    	http://ayo.us5.freshrpms.net/fedora/linux/$releasever/$basearch/updates
    failovermethod=priority
    enabled=1
    gpgcheck=1
    [freshrpms]
    name=FreshRPMS-Fresh
    baseurl=http://ayo.freshrpms.net/fedora/linux/$releasever/$basearch/freshrpms
    	http://ayo.us5.freshrpms.net/fedora/linux/$releasever/$basearch/freshrpms
    failovermethod=priority
    enabled=1
    gpgcheck=1

    Be sure there is a carriage return (blank line) at the bottom of the file. Click the “save” icon in gedit and then close gedit. Type the following in the root terminal:

    gedit /etc/yum.repos.d/dries.repo

    Hit enter and gedit will open. Type the following in gedit:

    [dries]
    name=Extra Fedora rpms dries - $releasever - $basearch
    baseurl=http://ftp.belnet.be/packages/dries.ulyssis.org/fedora/linux/$releasever/$basearch/dries/RPMS/
    	http://apt.sw.be/dries/fedora/fc4/$basearch/dries/RPMS/
    failovermethod=priority
    enabled=1
    gpgcheck=1

    Be sure there is a carriage return (blank line) at the bottom of the file. Click the “save” icon in gedit and then close gedit. Type the following in the root terminal:

    gedit /etc/yum.repos.d/newrpms.repo

    Hit enter and gedit will open. Type the following in gedit:

    [newrpms.sunsite.dk]
    name=Fedora Core 4 i386 NewRPMS.sunsite.dk
    baseurl=http://newrpms.sunsite.dk/apt/redhat/en/$basearch/fc$releasever
    	http://newrpms.atrpms.net/apt/redhat/en/$basearch/fc$releasever
    failovermethod=priority
    enabled=1
    gpgcheck=1

    Be sure there is a carriage return (blank line) at the bottom of the file. Click the “save” icon in gedit and then close gedit.

  • While still in the root terminal type:

    rpm --import http://freshrpms.net/packages/RPM-GPG-KEY.txt

    Hit enter. Type:

    rpm --import http://dries.ulyssis.org/rpm/RPM-GPG-KEY.dries.txt

    Hit enter. Type:

    rpm --import http://newrpms.sunsite.dk/gpg-pubkey-newrpms.txt

    Hit enter. Type:

    rpm --import /usr/share/doc/fedora-release-*/*GPG-KEY*

    Hit enter. You have just imported the GPG keys for your yum repositories. Type:

    yum update

    Hit enter. Your system will be updated. Answer “y” for “yes” in the appropriate places. Reboot.

  • Note: You can temporarily disable a troublesome repository with a command such as, for example “yum –disablerepo=dries update” as root. This is especially useful if you get the message “No more mirrors to try…” which occurs occasionally when the mirrors are very busy or down. If you get errors with up2date or yum with error messages similar to “Error: Missing Dependency: arts = 8:1.5.0-0.2.fc4 is needed by package arts-devel” do as root a “yum –exclude arts –exclude arts-devel update”. If you get errors with up2date or yum update related to gnbd-kernel, GFS-kernel, cman-kernel and/or dlm-kernel do a “yum remove gnbd-kernel GFS-kernel cman-kernel dlm-kernel” as root and then a “yum update” as root and reboot into the new kernel. After you do this, if you want these files back, just do a “yum install gnbd-kernel GFS-kernel cman-kernel dlm-kernel”. These are cluster related packages that you probably don’t need anyway. Please see the official Fedora Core Yum guide at http://fedora.redhat.com/docs/yum/ for more details about Yum and its configuration.

Apt and Synaptic:

  • Apt and Synaptic are now deprecated in Fedora Core in favor of Yum, however they are still available and can be installed although this is not recommended. Apt and Synaptic lack critical features like multilib support that are required in Fedora. Mutilib support means that software from different architectures like i386 and x86_64 can be mixed together. Because of this incompatibility Apt does not understand multi lib RPMs and treats them as duplicates. Please see http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Tools/Apt. As mentioned in the preface this document assumes an i386 to i686 system (32 bit). I suggest using the Apt/Synaptic combination only on 32 bit systems and only as a complement to Yum which is now the recommended application for rpm installation, dependency resolution, and updates. To install Apt and Synaptic enable the repositories as described above for Yum, then open a terminal and type:

    su -

    Hit enter. Type your root password. Hit enter. Type:

    yum -y install apt

    Hit enter. Wait for the installation to complete. Type:

    yum -y install synaptic

    Hit enter. Wait for the installation to complete. Type:

    gedit /etc/apt/sources.list.d/dag.list

    Hit enter and gedit will open. If there is nothing in this file (blank page), type the following in gedit:

    # Name: Dag RPM Repository
    # URL: http://dag.wieers.com/apt/
    
    ### Dag RPM Repository for Fedora Core
    rpm http://apt.sw.be fedora/4/en/i386 dag

    Be sure there is a carriage return (blank line) at the bottom of the file. Click the “save” icon in gedit and then close gedit. While still in the root terminal, type:

    gedit /etc/apt/sources.list.d/freshrpms.list

    Hit enter and gedit will open. If there is nothing in this file (blank page), type the following in gedit:

    # Name: FreshRPMS
    # URL: http://ayo.freshrpms.net/
    
    ### Fedora Core
    rpm http://ayo.freshrpms.net fedora/linux/4/i386 freshrpms

    Be sure there is a carriage return (blank line) at the bottom of the file. Click the “save” icon in gedit and then close gedit. While still in the root terminal, type:

    gedit /etc/apt/sources.list.d/dries.list

    Hit enter and gedit will open. If there is nothing in this file (blank page), type the following in gedit:

    # Name: Dries RPM Repository
    # URL: http://dries.studentenweb.org/apt/
    
    ### Fedora Core
    rpm http://apt.sw.be dries/fedora/fc4/i386 dries
    gedit /etc/apt/sources.list.d/newrpms.list

Hit enter and gedit will open. If there is nothing in this file (blank page), type the following in gedit:

# Name: NewRPMS # URL: http://newrpms.sunsite.dk/  ### Fedora Core rpm http://newrpms.sunsite.dk/apt/ redhat/en/i386/fc4 newrpms

–> Be sure there is a carriage return (blank line) at the bottom of the file. Click the “save” icon in gedit and then close gedit. While still in the root terminal, type:

rpm --import http://dries.ulyssis.org/rpm/RPM-GPG-KEY.dries.txt

Hit enter. Type:

rpm --import http://dag.wieers.com/packages/RPM-GPG-KEY.dag.txt

Hit enter. Type:

rpm --import http://freshrpms.net/packages/RPM-GPG-KEY.txt
rpm -insertanotherdashhereimport http://newrpms.sunsite.dk/gpg-pubkey-newrpms.txt

–> Hit enter. You have just imported the GPG keys for your apt repositories. Type:

apt-get update

Your apt repository package list will be updated. Close the terminal.

  • Go to “Desktop” > “System Settings” > “More System Settings” >”Synaptic package manager”. You will be asked to enter your root password. In Synaptic click on the “reload” icon to update your package list. You may now add programs to your Fedora Core installation by scrolling down the package list and checking appropriate check boxes for packages that you wish to add. When you are finished selecting them, click “apply”.

Firefox and Thunderbird:

  • Firefox is now the default web browser in Fedora Core Linux and Thunderbird is included as an email client. (If you don’t already have Thunderbird open a terminal and do a “yum -y install thunderbird” as root.) For Thunderbird go to “Applications” > “Internet” > “Thunderbird Email”. You can choose Thunderbird as your default email client by going to “Desktop” > “Preferences” > “More Preferences” > “Preferred Applications” and selecting “Thunderbird Mail” in the drop-down menu under the Mail Reader tab.

nVidia and ATI graphics acceleration:

True Type fonts:

  • Click on the terminal icon. This will open the terminal. Type:

    su

    Hit enter, type your root password and hit enter. (This gives you root privileges in the terminal even though you are still in the default user’s home directory.) Type:

    ls

    Hit enter. This will list the contents of your home directory so you can see if the file you just saved is there. Type:

    rpm -ivh *.rpm

    Hit enter. Wait for the installation to complete. Type:

    rm *.rpm

    Hit enter. Type “y” and hit enter. (This deletes the downloaded RPM file in your home directory, however the program is already installed into your system.) Close the terminal. Log out and log back in.

Fedora Extras:

  • Many of the packages which were once maintained in the “Core” of the Fedora Core distribution have been moved to the “Extras” repository in FC4. It is trivially easy to install these programs because the Fedora Extras repository is enabled by default in yum. See http://fedora.redhat.com/docs/release-notes/fc4/#sn-packages-moved for the list. In the following example we install “Grip”, the CD ripper, “gtk-gnutella”, the P2P client, and “NumLockX”, a program that turns NumLock on automatically after starting X windows, all from the Extras repository. We also install the screensavers (if you don’t already have them) with this command.
  • Click on the terminal icon. This will open the terminal. Type:

    su -

    Hit enter, type your root password and hit enter. Type:

    yum -y install grip gtk-gnutella numlockx xscreensaver-extras xscreensaver-gl-extras xscreensaver-base

    Hit enter. Wait for the installation to complete. Grip will now appear in “Applications” > “Sound & Video” as “Grip” and gtk-gnutella will be in “Applications” > “Internet” as “Gtk-Gnutella.

Yum Extender:

  • Yum Extender (yumex) is a new GUI front end for managing your updates and package installations via yum. Yum Extender is to yum as Synaptic is to apt. It is now included in Fedora Extras. To install yumex:
  • Click on the terminal icon. This will open the terminal. Type:

    su -

    Hit enter, type your root password and hit enter. Type:

    yum -y install yumex

    Hit enter. Wait for the installation to complete. Yum Extender will now appear in “Applications” > “System Tools”.

Java:

  • Fedora Core provides an open source implementation of Java. See http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/JavaFAQ for information about this. However many users, myself included, prefer Sun Java for their purposes. The official Fedora Core 4 Release Notes state: “Fedora Core 4 users are advised not to use the Java RPM provided by Sun. It contains Provides that conflict with names used in packages provided as part of Fedora Core 4. Because of this, Sun Java might disappear from an installed system during package upgrade operations. Fedora Core 4 users should use either the RPM from jpackage.org or manually install the Sun Java tarball into /opt. Sun Java 1.5+ is recommended for stability purposes.” For the first option please refer to the instructions at http://fedoranews.org/mediawiki/index.php/JPackage_Java_for_FC4. The second option is preferred by the author (install Java into /opt) and is done as follows. (If you wish to install the JDK which includes the Java development environment rather than the JRE download the JDK .bin file from Sun instead of the JRE .bin file, substitute “jdk1.5.0_06” for “jre1.5.0_06” in the commands below and use “ln -s /opt/jdk1.5.0_06/jre/plugin/i386/ns7/libjavaplugin_oji.so /usr/lib/mozilla/plugins/libjavaplugin_oji.so” rather than “ln -s /opt/jre1.5.0_06/plugin/i386/ns7/libjavaplugin_oji.so /usr/lib/mozilla/plugins/libjavaplugin_oji.so” to create the browser plugin.) Open Firefox, go to http://java.sun.com/j2se/1.5.0/download.jsp, click on Download JRE 5.0 Update 6, click the radio button to accept the license agreement, under “Linux Platform – J2SE(TM) Runtime Environment 5.0 Update 5” click on “Linux self-extracting file”, to download jre-1_5_0_06-linux-i586.bin (save to disk). This should save the file to your home folder. If it saves the file to your desktop instead go to your desktop and drag the file into your “Home” folder. (Left mouse click on the file and drag it on top of your “Home” folder while holding the left mouse button down. Then release the mouse button.)
  • You should run up2date or “yum update” as root as described above to update your kernel and then reboot your machine before you proceed with this step, then open a terminal. Type:

    su

    Hit enter. Type your root password. Hit enter. Type:

    mv *.bin /opt

    Hit enter. Type:

    cd /opt

    Hit enter. Type:

    chmod +x *-linux-i586.bin

    Hit enter. Type:

    ./*.bin

    Hit enter. Hold the enter key down until the yes/no line appears to allow you to agree to the license agreement. Type “yes” and hit enter. Wait for the installation to complete. Type:

    rm *.bin

    Hit enter. Type “y” and hit enter. Type:

    su -

    Hit enter. This gives you root privileges and also puts you in the /root directory. Type:

    ln -s /opt/jre1.5.0_06/plugin/i386/ns7/libjavaplugin_oji.so /usr/lib/mozilla/plugins/libjavaplugin_oji.so

    (Note that by default Firefox looks in /usr/lib/mozilla/plugins for its plugins. If you have trouble with your plugins in Firefox you could substitute “firefox-1.0.7” or your most recent firefox directory name in place of “mozilla” in the above command.) Hit enter. Close the terminal. Restart Firefox to enable the java plugin. You could go to http://www.dslreports.com/stest?loc=97 and click the start button to test your java plugin installation. (We are not done with Java quite yet, even though your browser plugin is working. Please proceed to the next step.)

  • If you wish to run Java applications such as LimeWire, JAlbum or Azureus and you have installed the Sun J2SE JRE into /opt as described above, open a terminal and type:

    su -

    Hit enter. Type your root password. Hit enter. Type:

    gedit /etc/profile.d/java.sh

    Hit enter. In gedit type these lines:

    export J2RE_HOME=/opt/jre1.5.0_06
    export PATH=$J2RE_HOME/bin:$PATH

    Be sure to enter a carriage return after these lines. Click on the “save” icon in gedit and exit gedit. In the terminal (which should still be open) type:

    source /etc/profile.d/java.sh

    Hit enter. Type:

    which java

    Hit enter. You should see:

    /opt/jre1.5.0_06/bin/java

    Type:

    /usr/sbin/alternatives --install /usr/bin/java java /opt/jre1.5.0_06/bin/java 2

    Hit enter. Type:

    /usr/sbin/alternatives --config java

    Hit enter. You should see:

    There are 2 programs which provide 'java'.
    
      Selection    Command
    -----------------------------------------------
    
    *+ 1           /usr/lib/jvm/jre-1.4.2-gcj/bin/java
       2           /opt/jre1.5.0_06/bin/java
    
    Enter to keep the current selection[+], or type selection number:

    Type:

    2

    Hit enter. Type:

    /usr/sbin/alternatives --display java

    Hit enter. You should see:

    java - status is manual.
     link currently points to /opt/jre1.5.0_06/bin/java
    ...

    You should now be able to install and run Java applications.

Flash:

  • Open Firefox. Go to http://macromedia.mplug.org/site_uh.html and download (save to disk) the flash-plugin for Fedora Core. This should save the file to your home folder. If it saves the file to your desktop instead go to your desktop and drag the file into your “Home” folder. (Left mouse click on the file and drag it on top of your “Home” folder while holding the left mouse button down. Then release the mouse button.)
  • Open the terminal. Type:

    su

    Hit enter. Type your root password. Hit enter. Type:

    rpm -ivh *.rpm

    Hit enter. Click “accept” in the license agreement windows that appears. Wait for the installation to complete. Type:

    rm *.rpm

    Hit enter. Type “y” and hit enter. Close the terminal. Reboot your machine. You could go to http://www.studiocleo.com/ to test your flash plugin installation.

RealPlayer:

  • Open Firefox. Go to http://www.real.com/linux/ and download (save to disk) the RealPlayer10GOLD.rpm package. This should save the file to your home folder. If it saves the file to your desktop instead go to your desktop and drag the file into your “Home” folder. (Left mouse click on the file and drag it on top of your “Home” folder while holding the left mouse button down. Then release the mouse button.)
  • Open the terminal. Type:

    su

    Hit enter. Type your root password. Hit enter. If you have not already done so type:

    yum -y install compat-libstdc++-33

    Hit enter. Wait for compat-libstdc++-33 to be installed. Type:

    rpm -ivh *.rpm

    Hit enter. Wait for the installation to complete. Type:

    rm *.rpm

    Hit enter. Type “y” and hit enter. Because HelixPlayer interferes with the browser plug-in function of RealPlayer we will remove it. Type:

    yum remove HelixPlayer

    Hit enter. Type “y” and hit enter. Close the terminal. Close and restart Firefox to enable the RealPlayer plugin, go to http://www.npr.org/, click on “NPR Program Stream”, select “Listen to NPR audio with the Real player” and complete the RealPlayer Setup Assistant to test your RealPlayer plugin installation. (If the RealPlayer option does not initially appear in the dialog box click the radio button “open with” and click the checkbox “Do this automatically for files like this form now on”, then click the “browse” button in the dialog box and in the file system browse to /usr/bin/realplay. Click “open”. Click “OK”.)

Rhythmbox:

  • Rhythmbox (Music Player) is the default music player in FC4 but does not come with MP3 support out of the box because of patent issues. (It is found in “Applications” > “Sound & Video” as “Music Player”.) To enable MP3 support for Music Player configure apt and synaptic as described above. Go to “Desktop” > “System Settings” > “More System Settings” >”Synaptic package manager”. You will be asked to enter your root password. In Synaptic click on the “reload” icon to update your package list. Find the gstreamer stuff and click in the checkboxes (then click “Mark for installation”) for each of “gstreamer”, “gstreamer-plugins”, and “gstreamer-plugins-extra-audio”. Click the “Apply” button in Synaptic. When the installation completes close Synaptic. You should also do a “yum install gstreamer-tools” as root. You should now have MP3 support in Rhythmbox (Music Player).

Adobe Reader:

  • Open the terminal. Type:

    wget ftp://ftp.adobe.com/pub/adobe/reader/unix/7x/7.0/enu/AdobeReader_enu-7.0.1-1.i386.rpm

    Hit enter. After the download completes type:

    su

    Hit enter. Type your root password. Hit enter. If you have not already done so type:

    yum -y install compat-libstdc++-33

    Hit enter. Wait for compat-libstdc++-33 to be installed. Type:

    rpm -Uvh *.rpm

    Hit enter. After the installation completes type:

    rm *.rpm

    Hit enter. Type “y” and hit enter. Type:

    acroread

    Hit enter. Adobe Reader will open. Click the “accept” button to accept the licence agreement. Close Adobe Reader. Type:

    gedit /etc/mozpluggerrc

    Hit enter. (If you don’t already have mozplugger the file /etc/mozpluggerrc will be blank. In that case close it without saving it, open a terminal and do a “yum install mozplugger” as root. Then repeat the above command.) In /etc/mozpluggerrc comment out the pdf section with “#”s so that it looks like this:

    #######################
    ###application/pdf: pdf: PDF file
    ###application/x-pdf: pdf: PDF file
    ###text/pdf: pdf: PDF file
    ###text/x-pdf: pdf: PDF file
    ###	repeat swallow(documentShell) fill: acroread -geometry +9000+9000 +useFrontEndProgram "$file"
    ###	repeat noisy swallow(Xpdf) fill: xpdf -g +9000+9000 "$file"
    ###	repeat noisy swallow(gv) fill: gv -safer -quiet -antialias -geometry +9000+9000 "$file"
    #######################

    Click the “save” button in gedit and close gedit. Type:

    cd /usr/lib/mozilla/plugins

    (Note that by default Firefox looks in /usr/lib/mozilla/plugins for its plugins. If you have trouble with your plugins in Firefox you could substitute “firefox-1.0.7” or your most recent firefox directory name in place of “mozilla” in the above command.) Hit enter. Type:

    ln -s /usr/local/Adobe/Acrobat7.0/Browser/intellinux/nppdf.so .

    (Be sure to include the period at the end of the line.) Hit enter. Close the terminal. Open a terminal as your regular user (not root). Type:

    cd .mozilla/firefox

    Hit enter. Type:

    rm pluginreg.dat

    Hit enter. Close the terminal. Restart Firefox. Adobe Reader is installed. You could go to http://stanton-finley.net/fedora_core_4_installation_notes.pdf to test your Adobe Reader installation. (I notice that this does not work if there is more than one tab open in Firefox or that it works sometimes if there is more than one tab open and the page is reloaded.) If you wish to open Adobe Reader outside of Firefox the command is “acroread”.

Xine – a DVD and multimedia player:

  • To install Xine, a DVD and multimedia player, configure yum as described above, then open a terminal. Type:

    su -

    Hit enter. Type your root password. Hit enter. Type:

    yum -y install xine xine-lib xine-skins

    Hit enter. Wait for the installation to complete. Close the terminal. You should now install the codecs as described below.

  • To get the most out of Xine and other media players such as MPlayer you will need to install additional codecs. In order to do this open Firefox, go to http://www4.mplayerhq.hu/MPlayer/releases/codecs/ and download (save to disk) all-20050412.tar.bz2. This should save the file to your home folder. If it saves the file to your desktop instead go to your desktop and drag the file into your “Home” folder. (Left mouse click on the file and drag it on top of your “Home” folder while holding the left mouse button down. Then release the mouse button.)
  • Open the terminal. Type:

    su

    Hit enter. Type your root password. Hit enter. Type:

    mkdir temp

    Hit enter. Type:

    mv *.bz2 temp

    Hit enter. Type:

    cd temp

    Hit enter. Type:

    tar xvfj *.tar.bz2

    Hit enter. Type:

    cd all-20050412

    Hit enter. Type:

    mkdir /usr/local/lib/codecs/

    Hit enter. Type:

    cp *.* /usr/local/lib/codecs/

    Hit enter. Type:

    cd /usr/local/lib/codecs/

    Hit enter. Type:

    chmod 755 /usr/local/lib/codecs/*

    Hit enter. Type:

    mkdir /usr/lib/win32

    Hit enter. Type:

    cp /usr/local/lib/codecs/* /usr/lib/win32

    Hit enter. Type:

    rm -rf /home/your_user_name/temp

    (Substitute the name of your home directory for “your_user_name”.) Hit enter. Close the terminal. The additional codecs are now installed.

Totem-xine – the Totem front end for Xine:

  • Totem-xine is a GTK2 front-end for xine-lib. Totem is a simple DVD and movie player. It features a simple playlist, a full-screen mode, seek and volume controls, as well as a pretty complete keyboard navigation system. Totem-xine is linked against xine-lib unlike the default Fedora Core Totem package, which is linked against Gstreamer. Many users prefer it over the default Totem player as it can take advantage of all the codecs available to Xine. To obtain Totem-xine we will do a one-time only invocation of the livna.org stable repository to download and install the RPM. Configure Xine and obtain the extra codecs as described in the Xine section above, then open the terminal. Type:

    su -

    Hit enter. Type your root password. Hit enter. Type:

    gedit /etc/yum.repos.d/livna.repo

    Hit enter and gedit will open. Type the following in gedit:

    [livna-stable]
    name=Livna.org Fedora Compatible Packages (stable)
    baseurl=http://rpm.livna.org/fedora/$releasever/$basearch/RPMS.lvn
    enabled=0
    gpgcheck=1

    (Note that we have the “enabled” bit set to “0” (off) in this file so that the livna-stable repository will not conflict with our RPMForge repositories for automatic updates.) Be sure there is a carriage return (blank line) at the bottom of the file. Click the “save” icon in gedit and then close gedit. Type the following in the root terminal:

    rpm --import http://rpm.livna.org/RPM-LIVNA-GPG-KEY

    Hit enter. Type:

    yum remove totem

    Hit enter. Type “y” and hit enter. Type:

    yum --enablerepo=livna-stable install totem-xine

    Hit enter. Type “y” and hit enter. Wait for the installation to complete. Totem-xine should now be available in “Applications” > “Sound & Video” as “Totem Movie Player”.

MPlayer – another multimedia player:

  • To obtain MPlayer configure yum as described in the yum section above and install the extra codecs as described in the Xine section above, then open the terminal. Type:

    su -

    Hit enter. Type your root password. Hit enter. Type:

    yum -y install mplayer mplayer-skins mplayer-fonts

    Hit enter and wait for the installation to complete, then close the terminal. Open a terminal as your regular user (not root). Type:

    gmplayer

    Hit enter. Mplayer will open. Close it. Type:

    gedit ~/.mplayer/config

    In gedit add these lines:

    # Write your default config options here!
    vo=xv
    ao=alsa

    Be sure to add a carriage return at the end of the file. Click the “save” button in gedit and close gedit. Close the terminal.

  • Thomas Chung of FedoraNEWS.org has kindly made an Mplayer plugin rpm build available which is “RealMedia disabled” (including the SMIL and OGG Mime Types) so that it will not conflict with your RealPlayer installation. To obtain this Mplayer plug-in for playing web-embedded movies and multimedia in your web browser install Mplayer as described above, then open Firefox, go to http://fedoranews.org/tchung/mplayerplug-in/3.21/ and download (save to disk) mplayerplug-in-3.21-1.fc4.i386.rpm. This should save the file to your home folder. If it saves the file to your desktop instead go to your desktop and drag the file into your “Home” folder. (Left mouse click on the file and drag it on top of your “Home” folder while holding the left mouse button down. Then release the mouse button.) Then open the terminal. Type:

    su

    Hit enter. Type your root password. Hit enter. Type:

    rpm -Uvh *.rpm

    Hit enter. Wait for the installation to complete. Type:

    rm *.rpm

    Hit enter. Type “y” and hit enter. Close the terminal. Close and restart Firefox to enable the plugin. (Note that by default the mplayerplug-in files are installed in /usr/lib/mozilla/plugins. Normally Firefox looks in /usr/lib/mozilla/plugins for its plugins by default. If you have trouble with the mplayerplug-in in Firefox log in as root and do a “cd /usr/lib/mozilla/plugins”, hit enter, then do a “cp mplayerplug-in* /usr/lib/firefox-1.0.7/plugins” and hit enter. This will copy the appropriate mplayerplug-in files into your current Firefox installation’s plugin directory. If your current Firefox installation directory is not /usr/lib/firefox-1.0.7 substitute the correct directory name in the above command.) In order to keep yum from overwriting this special version of mplayerplug-in after you install it you should do a “yum –exclude mplayerplug-in update” when you do your updates with yum. (Or for a permanent fix add the line “exclude=mplayerplug-in” to your /etc/yum.conf file. Be sure there is a new line/carriage return at the end of the file.) You could go to http://www.apple.com/trailers/ to test your MPlayer plugin installation.

XMMS – a music and MP3 player:

  • The popular XMMS media player (also called “Audio Player” in the Gnome menu) is available for FC4 in Fedora Extras. The freshrpms repository has an MP3 plugin for XMMS. To install XMMS along with its MP3 support make sure that the freshrpms repository is configured in yum as described above. Open a terminal. Type:

    su -

    Hit enter. Type your root password. Hit enter. Type:

    yum -y install xmms xmms-mp3

    Hit enter. Wait for the installation to complete. Close the terminal. XMMS will be available in “Applications” > “Sound & Video” as “Audio Player”.

Beep – another media player:

  • Beep is a GTK2 based port of the XMMS media player and is available for FC4 in Fedora Extras. The Dries repository has an MP3 plugin for Beep. To install Beep make sure that the Dries repository is configured in yum as described above. Open a terminal. Type:

    su -

    Hit enter. Type your root password. Hit enter. Type:

    yum -y install bmp bmp-mp3

    Hit enter. Wait for the installation to complete. Close the terminal. Beep will be available in “Applications” > “Sound & Video”.

VLC – the Videolan stand-alone media player:

  • The VideoLAN Client (VLC) is a highly portable multimedia player for various audio and video formats (MPEG-1, MPEG-2, MPEG-4, DivX, mp3, ogg, …) as well as DVDs, VCDs, and various streaming protocols. The Dries repository has a VLC rpm for FC4. To install VLC make sure that the Dries repository is configured in yum as described above. Open a terminal. Type:

    su -

    Hit enter. Type your root password. Hit enter. Type:

    yum -y install videolan-client

    Hit enter. Wait for the installation to complete. Close the terminal. VLC will be available in “Applications” > “Sound & Video” as “VideoLAN Client”.

Amarok – a KDE multimedia player:

  • Amarok is a KDE multimedia player (also works in Gnome) which is compatible with the .m3u and .pls formats for playlists. The Fedora Extras repository contains Amarok. To install Amarok and configure it to use the gstreamer engine first get all the gstreamer stuff as described in the Rhythmbox section above. Then open a terminal. Type:

    su -

    Hit enter. Type your root password. Hit enter. Type:

    yum install amarok

    Hit enter. Type “y” and hit enter. Wait for the installation to complete. Close the terminal. Amarok will be available in “Applications” > “Sound & Video” as “amaroK”. When you first open Amarok select your music directory and drag songs from it out onto the “playlist” panel. Then go to “Settings” > “Configure amaroK” > “Engine” and make sure that the “GStreamer Engine” is selected. You should now be able to play your MP3 and other format music playlists with Amarok.

NTFS support (for mounting your Windows partition):

  • Open the terminal. Type:

    su

    Hit enter. Type your root password. Hit enter. Type:

    uname -rm

    This will output your kernel version and processor type.

  • Open Firefox. Go to http://www.linux-ntfs.org/content/view/129/65/ and download (save to disk) the appropriate NTFS RPM for your kernel version and processor type. This should save the file to your home folder. If it saves the file to your desktop instead go to your desktop and drag the file into your “Home” folder. (Left mouse click on the file and drag it on top of your “Home” folder while holding the left mouse button down. Then release the mouse button.)
  • With the root terminal still open type:

    rpm -ivh *.rpm

    Hit enter. Wait for the installation to complete. Type:

    rm *.rpm

    Hit enter. Type “y” and hit enter. Type:

    su -

    Hit enter. Type:

    mkdir /mnt/windows

    Hit enter. Type:

    /sbin/fdisk -l

    Hit enter. This will output your HPFS/NTFS partition identifier. Type:

    gedit /etc/fstab

    Hit enter and gedit will open. Type the following in gedit:

    /dev/hda1	/mnt/windows	ntfs	ro,defaults,umask=0222	0 0

    If your partition identifier is not “/dev/hda1” substitute the correct characters. (For example it might be “/dev/sda1” if you have a SATA drive.) Click the “save” icon in gedit and exit gedit. Close the terminal. Reboot your machine. Your Windows partition should now be available in the file browser under “/mnt/windows”.

Bittorrent and bittorrent-gui:

  • Open the terminal. Type:

    su -

    Hit enter. Type your root password. Hit enter. Type:

    yum install bittorrent

    Hit enter. Type “y” and hit enter when you see “Is this ok [y/N]:”. Wait for the installation to complete. Type:

    yum install bittorrent-gui

    Hit enter. Type “y” and hit enter when you see “Is this ok [y/N]:”. Wait for the installation to complete. Type:

    /sbin/iptables -I INPUT -p tcp --destination-port 6881:6999 -j ACCEPT

    Hit enter. This adds a rule to open TCP ports 6881 through 6999 in your firewall. These ports are required by Bittorent. Type:

    /sbin/iptables-save > /etc/sysconfig/iptables

    Hit enter. This saves the rule. Type:

    /sbin/iptables -L

    Hit enter. This will output your iptables file so you can see if the rule was saved. Type:

    gedit /etc/mailcap

    Hit enter and gedit will open. Add these lines (and a carriage return) to /etc/mailcap:

    # bittorrent
    application/x-bittorrent; /usr/bin/bittorrent %s; test=test -n "$DISPLAY"

    Now you can download “.torrent” files from within Firefox.

Azureus for bittorrent:

  • In order to install Azureus you must have previously installed Java and configured it to run Java applications. (See above.) Open Firefox. Go to http://sourceforge.net/project/showfiles.php?group_id=84122 and download (save to disk) Azureus_2.3.0.4_linux.GTK.tar.bz2. This should save the file to your home folder. If it saves the file to your desktop instead go to your desktop and drag the file into your “Home” folder. (Left mouse click on the file and drag it on top of your “Home” folder while holding the left mouse button down. Then release the mouse button.)
  • If you have not already opened tcp ports 6881 through 6999 in your Fedora firewall for another bittorrent application such as the one described above open the terminal. Type:

    su -

    Hit enter. Type your root password. Hit enter. Type:

    /sbin/iptables -I INPUT -p tcp --destination-port 6881:6999 -j ACCEPT

    Hit enter. This adds a rule to open TCP ports 6881 through 6999 in your firewall. These ports are required by bittorent and/or Azureus. Type:

    /sbin/iptables-save > /etc/sysconfig/iptables

    Hit enter. This saves the rule. You must also open udp port 6881 for Azureus. Type:

    /sbin/iptables -I INPUT -p udp --destination-port 6881:6881 -j ACCEPT

    Hit enter. This adds a rule to open UDP port 6881 in your firewall. Type:

    /sbin/iptables-save > /etc/sysconfig/iptables

    Hit enter. This saves the rule. Type:

    /sbin/iptables -L

    Hit enter. This will output your iptables file so you can see if the rule was saved. Type:

    cd /home/your_user_name

    Hit enter. Type:

    tar xvfj *.tar.bz2

    Hit enter. Type:

    rm *.bz2

    Hit enter. Type “y” and hit enter. Type:

    cd azureus

    Hit enter. Type:

    ./azureus

    Hit enter. Azureus will open. Configure your preferences in the dialog box presented and update the plugin if asked. (If you get an error later when auto-updating you may have to log in as root (type “su -” in a terminal, hit enter, type your root password, hit enter), change to your home directory (cd /home/your_user_name), and run azureus as root temporarily to successfully update.) When you click on a “.torrent” file in Firefox you will be presented with a dialog box. Click the radio button “open with” and click the checkbox “Do this automatically for files like this form now on”, then click the “browse” button in the dialog box (or the down arrow on the left side of the text window and select “other”) and browse to “home” > “azureus”, double click on “azureus” and select “azureus”. Click “open”. Click “OK”. This will allow you to download “.torrent” files from within Firefox. Note: If you choose to download your files into a hidden directory such as the /home/your_user_name/.Azureus/shares folder you will have to click on “View” > “Show hidden files” in “Places” > “Home Folder” to get to them in the file browser.

LimeWire:

  • In order to install the LimeWire 4.10.9 basic (free) version you must have previously installed Java and configured it to run Java applications. (See above.) Open Firefox. Go to http://www.limewire.com/english/content/downloadfree2.shtml and in the “LIMEWIRE BASIC v 4.10.5” paragraph under the title “Other” download LimeWireOther.zip. This should save the file to your home folder. If it saves the file to your desktop instead go to your desktop and drag the file into your “Home” folder. (Left mouse click on the file and drag it on top of your “Home” folder while holding the left mouse button down. Then release the mouse button.) Open a terminal. Type:

    su

    Hit enter. Type your root password. Hit enter. Type:

    unzip -u LimeWireOther.zip -d /opt/

    Hit enter. Type:

    rm LimeWireOther.zip

    Hit enter. Type:

    chown -R root:root /opt/LimeWire/

    Hit enter. Type:

    gedit /usr/bin/limewire.sh

    Hit enter. In gedit type these lines:

    cd /opt/LimeWire/
    ./runLime.sh

    Be sure to enter a carriage return after these lines. Click on the “save” icon in gedit and exit gedit. In the terminal (which should still be open) type:

    chmod +x /usr/bin/limewire.sh

    Hit enter. Type:

    gedit /usr/share/applications/LimeWire.desktop

    Hit enter. In gedit type these lines:

    [Desktop Entry]
    Name=LimeWire
    Comment=LimeWire
    Exec=limewire.sh
    Icon=/opt/LimeWire/LimeWire.ico
    Terminal=false
    Type=Application
    Categories=Application;Network;

    Be sure to enter a carriage return after these lines. Click on the “save” icon in gedit and exit gedit. Limewire should now be available in “Applications” > “Internet” as “LimeWire”.

Web Server:

  • Apache 2.0.54 is available for Fedora Core 4. If you have not already done so go to “Desktop” > “System Settings” > “Add/Remove Applications”, enter your root password (or run the “system-config-packages” command as root), then tick the check box for “Web Server”, click “details” and tick all the check boxes except the Tomcat5 entries, click “close”, click “update” and “continue”. You may be asked to insert the Fedora Core 4 installation disk #1 to continue. Go to “Desktop” > “System Settings” > “Security Level”. Provide your root password, click “ok” and on the “Firewall Options” tab make sure the check boxes next to “WWW (HTTP)” and “Secure WWW (HTTPS) are checked. On the “SELinux” tab under (expanded) “HTTPD Service” make sure all the checkboxes are checked except “Disable SELinux protection for httpd daemon”. (Please see http://fedora.redhat.com/docs/selinux-faq-fc3/ for important SELinux considerations.) Check the checkbox next to “Relabel on next reboot”. (You will have to re-configure your iptables setup after your next boot as described in the Azureus section above as the relabel process overwrites your iptables files.) Click “ok”. Reboot your machine.
  • Subscribe to a service such as https://www.dyndns.org/ or http://www.easydns.com/ to register a new domain name (such as your-name.org) and to have their DNS service map your computer’s IP address to your new registered domain name. (The command “ifconfig” at the root prompt will output your IP address.) If you have a “dynamic” (changeable) IP address you can use their dynamic DNS service.
  • If you are using a router you may have to forward ports 80, 8080, and 443 in order for your web server to work through your router’s firewall. See http://www.portforward.com/routers.htm for instructions.
  • Open the terminal. Type:

    su -

    Hit enter. Type your root password. Hit enter. Type “ifconfig”. Hit enter. This will output the IP address of your machine (the numbers after “inet addr:”) or if you are behind a router or gateway go to http://checkip.dyndns.org/ or http://myipaddress.com/ to determine the IP address that the outside world sees for your machine and use that as your IP address in the following. Type:

    gedit /etc/hosts

    Hit enter. In gedit edit your /etc/hosts file to include a line containing your IP address, your domain name, and your short domain name (the characters before the dot). Be sure to include a carriage return after this line. When you are finished your hosts file should look something like this:

    # Do not remove the following line, or various programs
    # that require network functionality will fail.
    127.0.0.1		localhost.localdomain localhost
    67.172.236.37		stantonfinley.org stantonfinley

    Click on the “save” icon in gedit and exit gedit. Type:

    gedit /etc/sysconfig/network

    Hit enter. In gedit edit your /etc/sysconfig/network file and replace “localhost.localdomain” with your domain name. When you are finished your network file should look something like this:

    NETWORKING=yes
    HOSTNAME=stantonfinley.org

    Click on the “save” icon in gedit and exit gedit. Type:

    gedit /etc/httpd/conf/httpd.conf

    Hit enter. Go to “File” > “Save As…”, type “httpd.conf.original” in the “Save As…” box and click “Save”. This creates a backup of your httpd.conf file. Type:

    gedit /etc/httpd/conf/httpd.conf

    Hit enter. (You are about to edit your Apache web server configuration file. Please see http://httpd.apache.org/docs/2.0/ for important information about what the configuration lines we are about to edit do.) In gedit scroll down to the “ServerAdmin” section and enter your email address instead of “root@localhost”. Scroll down to the “#ServerName” section and uncomment it (take out the “#”). Then enter the registered DNS name of your web site (“whatever.com”) or your server’s IP address instead of “www.example.com”. (If you don’t know your IP address type “ifconfig” at the root prompt.) Scroll down and change “UseCanonicalName Off” to “UseCanonicalName On”. Scroll down to the “Options” line and change “Options Indexes FollowSymLinks” to “Options Indexes Includes FollowSymLinks SymLinksifOwnerMatch ExecCGI MultiViews”. Change “AllowOverride None” to “AllowOverride Options FileInfo AuthConfig Limit” in case you want to use .htaccess files in any of your web subdirectories. Change “DirectoryIndex index.html index.html.var” to “DirectoryIndex index.html index.html.var index.shtml index.cgi index.php index.phtml index.php3 index.htm home.html welcome.html”. Under the “AddType application/x-compress .Z” and “AddType application/x-gzip .gz .tgz” lines add the line: “AddType application/x-httpd-php .php .phps .php3 .phtml .html .htm .shtml .fds”. Uncomment the line “#AddHandler cgi-script .cgi” and add “.pl” so that it reads “AddHandler cgi-script .cgi .pl”. If you wish to enable support to serve web pages from user’s home directories as well comment (add a “#” in front of) “UserDir disable” so that it reads “#UserDir disable” and uncomment “#UserDir public_html” so that it reads “UserDir public_html”. Then uncomment and edit the control access stanza for user directories below it so that it looks something like this:

    <Directory /home/*/public_html>
        AllowOverride Options FileInfo AuthConfig Limit
        Options Indexes Includes FollowSymLinks SymLinksifOwnerMatch ExecCGI MultiViews
        <Limit GET POST OPTIONS>
            Order allow,deny
            Allow from all
        </Limit>
        <LimitExcept GET POST OPTIONS>
            Order deny,allow
            Allow from all
        </LimitExcept>
    </Directory>

    Click on the “save” icon in gedit to save your httpd.conf file and exit gedit. Close the terminal.

  • Open a terminal as your regular user (not root). Type:

    mkdir public_html

    Hit enter. Type:

    chmod -R 755 public_html

    Hit enter. Close the terminal.

  • Open the terminal. Type:

    su -

    Hit enter. Type your root password. Hit enter. Type:

    cd /home

    Hit enter. Type:

    chmod 711 your_user_name

    Hit enter. Type:

    chcon -R -t httpd_user_content_t /home/your_user_name/public_html/

    (Use the name of the user’s home directory you are working with in place of “your_user_name”.) Hit enter. Close the terminal.

  • If you have a favicon.ico copy it to /var/www/html while still logged in as root (cp favicon.ico /var/www/html).
  • Go to “Desktop” > “System Settings” > “Server Settings” > “Services”. Type in your root password in the dialog box that appears and click on “OK”. Scroll down the list and check the check box for “httpd”. Click on the “save” icon in the Service Configuration window and then close the window. Do this for runlevel 3 as well as for runlevel 5. Reboot your machine.
  • Open Firefox and type “http://localhost/” in the URL window and hit enter. You should see the default Apache/Fedora Core test page. Type your server’s IP address in the URL window and hit enter. You should see the test page again. Type the registered DNS name of your web site (“whatever.com”) in the URL window and hit enter. You should see the test page yet again.
  • While still logged in as root copy or move your web site index.html and any other HTTP content you may have to /var/www/html and/or to /home/your_user_name/public_html. Change permissions on these files to be viewable and executable as appropriate on the web (usually “chmod 755 *”). You are now serving web pages from your Fedora Core web server. You will find your server log files in /etc/httpd/logs and you will be able to view them while logged in as root.

FTP Server:

  • The secure FTP server vsftpd version 2.0.3 is available in Fedora Core 4. If you have not already done so go to “Desktop” > “System Settings” > “Add/Remove Applications”, enter your root password (or run the “system-config-packages” command as root), then tick the check box for “FTP Server”, click “close”, click “update” and “continue”. You may be asked to insert the Fedora Core 4 installation disk #3 to continue. Go to “Desktop” > “System Settings” > “Security Level”. Provide your root password, click “ok” and on the “Firewall Options” tab make sure the checkbox next to “FTP” is checked. On the “SELinux” tab under (expanded) “FTP” make sure all the checkboxes are checked except “Disable SELinux protection for ftpd daemon”. Check the checkbox next to “Relabel on next reboot”. (You will have to re-configure your iptables setup after your next boot as described in the Azureus section above as the relabel process overwrites your iptables files.) Click “ok”. Reboot your machine to enable the new SELinux settings.
  • If you are using a router you may have to forward ports 20 and 21 in order for your FTP server to work through your router’s firewall. See http://www.portforward.com/routers.htm for instructions.
  • Register a new domain name for your Fedora box, have it mapped to your IP address, and configure your /etc/hosts and /etc/sysconfig/network files as described in the web server section above.
  • Open the terminal. Type:

    su -

    Hit enter. Type:

    gedit /etc/vsftpd/vsftpd.conf

    Hit enter. In gedit change “anonymous_enable=YES” to “anonymous_enable=NO”. Also add a line that reads “chroot_local_user=YES” just under the line that reads “#chroot_list_file=/etc/vsftpd/chroot_list”. Also uncomment (remove the “#” from) the ascii_ lines so that they read “ascii_upload_enable=YES” and “ascii_download_enable=YES”. Click on the “save” icon in gedit to save your vsftpd.conf file and exit gedit. Close the terminal.

  • Go to “Desktop” > “System Settings” > “Server Settings” > “Services”. Type in your root password in the dialog box that appears and click on “OK”. Scroll down the list and check the check box for “vsftpd”. Click on the “save” icon in the Service Configuration window and then close the window. Do this for runlevel 3 as well as for runlevel 5. Reboot your machine. You should now be able to access your home user’s directory with an FTP client. The host name on your client will be your registered domain name or the IP address of your Fedora Core box. The user ID will be your Fedora Core non-root user name. The password will be your Fedora Core non-root user’s password. (I recommend turning off passive mode on the client to speed up transfers. If you use gftp as a client you should edit /etc/sysconfig/iptables-config on the server and add “ip_nat_ftp” into the “IPTABLES_MODULES=”” directive so that it reads “IPTABLES_MODULES=”ip_nat_ftp”. Then reboot your machine.)

PHP and Perl:

  • PHP 5.0.4 and Perl v5.8.6 are available in Fedora Core 4 when we install the web server as described above. If you have enabled the Apache web server (see above) you can test your PHP and Perl installations by doing the following: Open the terminal. Type:

    su -

    Hit enter. Type your root password. Hit enter. Type:

    gedit /var/www/html/phpinfo.php

    Hit enter and gedit will open. In gedit type:

    <?php phpinfo();?>

    Click the “save” icon in gedit and close gedit. While still in the root terminal type:

    gedit /var/www/html/printenv.pl

    Hit enter and gedit will open. In gedit type:

    #!/usr/bin/perl
    ##
    ##  printenv -- demo CGI program which just prints its environment
    ##
    
    print "Content-type: text/plain\n\n";
    foreach $var (sort(keys(%ENV))) {
        $val = $ENV{$var};
        $val =~ s|\n|\\n|g;
        $val =~ s|"|\\"|g;
        print "${var}=\"${val}\"\n";
    }

    Click the “save” icon in gedit and close gedit. Type:

    chmod 755 /var/www/html/printenv.pl

    Hit enter. Then type:

    chmod 755 /var/www/html/phpinfo.php

    Hit enter. Now when you open these files from your web server (http://whatever.com/phpinfo.php and http://whatever.com/printenv.pl) you will be able to prove the functionality of your PHP and Perl installations. (In order to allow cgi scripts to execute outside of the cgi-bin directory configure your httpd.conf as described in the web server section above.)

  • Special note on configuring sendmail for PHP using your email provider’s SMTP (simple mail transport protocol): Your /etc/php.ini file uses sendmail as the default transport agent for sending email from PHP applications (“sendmail_path = /usr/sbin/sendmail -t -i”). If you have not already done so edit (with gedit as we have been doing) “/etc/hosts” as root (type “su -” in a terminal, hit enter, type your root password, hit enter) and add the line “your.ip.address whatever.org whatever” where “your.ip.address” is the IP address of your web server, “whatever.org” is the registered DNS name of your web site (your canonical domain name), and “whatever” is your short domain name (the characters before the dot). Separate the IP address from the domain name with a couple of tabs. Edit “/etc/sysconfig/network” and change “localhost.localdomain” to “whatever.org” where “whatever.org” is the registered DNS name of your web site (your canonical domain name). Reboot. Edit “/etc/mail/local-host-names” and include your domain name. Edit “/etc/mail/sendmail.mc” and change “dnl define(`SMART_HOST’,`smtp.your.provider’)dnl” to “define(`SMART_HOST’,`smtp.your.provider’)dnl” where “smtp.your.provider” is the smtp host that you use to send mail from your email client. Also change “DAEMON_OPTIONS(`Port=smtp,Addr=127.0.0.1, Name=MTA’)dnl” to “dnl DAEMON_OPTIONS(`Port=smtp,Addr=127.0.0.1, Name=MTA’)dnl”. Also change “dnl MASQUERADE_AS(`mydomain.com’)dnl” to “MASQUERADE_AS(`your.provider.com’)dnl” where “your.provider.com” is the host that you use to send mail from your email client (the characters after the “@”). Add these lines (near the bottom of /etc/mail/sendmail.mc but above “MAILER”): “FEATURE(`genericstable’,`hash -o /etc/mail/genericstable.db’)dnl” and “GENERICS_DOMAIN_FILE(`/etc/mail/generics-domains’)dnl”. Edit or create if required: “/etc/mail/generics-domains”. Include in “/etc/mail/generics-domains” your canonical domain name. (Be sure to add a carriage return.) Edit or create if required: “/etc/mail/genericstable”. Include in “/etc/mail/genericstable” the line:”username mailusername@your.provider.com” where “username” is your non-root Fedora user name and “mailusername@your.provider.com” is your email address that you use with your email client. (Be sure to add a carriage return.) As root execute the command: “make -C /etc/mail”. This will regenerate “/etc/mail/sendmail.cf”. As root do a “yum -y install sendmail-cf”. Reboot or start (or restart) sendmail from “Desktop” > “System Settings” > “Server Settings” > “Services”. (See http://www.linuxhomenetworking.com/linux-hn/sendmail.htm.)

MySQL:

  • MySQL Ver 14.7 Distrib 4.1.11 is available in Fedora Core 4. If you have not already done so go to “Desktop” > “System Settings” > “Add/Remove Applications”, enter your root password (or run the “system-config-packages” command as root), then tick the check box for “MySQL Database”, click “details” and tick all the check boxes, click “close”, click “update” and “continue”. You may be asked to insert the Fedora Core 4 installation disk #3 to continue. Go to “Desktop” > “System Settings” > “Server Settings” > “Services”. Type in your root password in the dialog box that appears and click on “OK”. Scroll down the list and check the check box for “mysqld”. Click on the “save” icon in the Service Configuration window and then close the window. Do this for runlevel 3 as well as for runlevel 5. Reboot your machine to start the MySQL service or enter the command “/sbin/service mysqld start” as root.
  • Open the terminal. Type:

    su -

    Hit enter. Type your root password. Hit enter. Type:

    gedit /etc/my.cnf

    Hit enter. In the mysqld section of my.cnf add the line:

    skip-innodb

    Your my.cnf should now look something like this:

    [mysqld]
    datadir=/var/lib/mysql
    socket=/var/lib/mysql/mysql.sock
    # Default to using old password format for compatibility with mysql 3.x
    # clients (those using the mysqlclient10 compatibility package).
    old_passwords=1
    skip-innodb
    
    [mysql.server]
    user=mysql
    basedir=/var/lib
    
    [mysqld_safe]
    err-log=/var/log/mysqld.log
    pid-file=/var/run/mysqld/mysqld.pid

    Click the “save” icon in gedit and close gedit. While still in the root terminal type:

    mysql -u root

    Hit enter. You will see the mysql> query prompt. Type:

    select user, host, password, select_priv, update_priv, delete_priv, insert_priv from mysql.user;

    Hit enter. You will see something like this:

    +------+------------------------+----------+-------------+-------------+-------------+-------------+
    | user | host                   | password | select_priv | update_priv | delete_priv | insert_priv |
    +------+------------------------+----------+-------------+-------------+-------------+-------------+
    | root | localhost              |          | Y           | Y           | Y           | Y           |
    | root | stantonfinley.org      |          | Y           | Y           | Y           | Y           |
    |      | localhost              |          | N           | N           | N           | N           |
    |      | stantonfinley.org      |          | N           | N           | N           | N           |
    +------+------------------------+----------+-------------+-------------+-------------+-------------+
    4 rows in set (0.17 sec)
    
    mysql>

    Type:

    set password for 'root'@'localhost' = password ('newpassword');

    where “newpassword” is the password that you want to use for the root MySQL super user. Hit enter. Type:

    set password for 'root'@'host' = password ('newpassword');

    where “host” is the name of your host as reported in the “host” column above and “newpassword” is the password that you want to use for the root MySQL super user. Hit enter. Type:

    select user, host, password, select_priv, update_priv, delete_priv, insert_priv from mysql.user;

    Hit enter. You will see something like this with your password hash-encrypted in the “password” column:

    +------+------------------------+------------------+-------------+-------------+-------------+-------------+
    | user | host                   | password         | select_priv | update_priv | delete_priv | insert_priv |
    +------+------------------------+------------------+-------------+-------------+-------------+-------------+
    | root | localhost              | 1e36745e3c0f99b0 | Y           | Y           | Y           | Y           |
    | root | stantonfinley.org      | 1e36745e3c0f99b0 | Y           | Y           | Y           | Y           |
    |      | localhost              |                  | N           | N           | N           | N           |
    |      | stantonfinley.org      |                  | N           | N           | N           | N           |
    +------+------------------------+------------------+-------------+-------------+-------------+-------------+
    4 rows in set (0.00 sec)
    
    mysql>

    Type:

    exit

    Close the terminal. Reboot your machine. Open a terminal. Type:

    su -

    Hit enter. Type your root password. Hit enter. Type:

    mysql -u root -p

    Hit enter. MySQL should ask for your MySQL super user password. Type it in. Hit enter. Type:

    exit

    You have successfully set up MySQL.

phpMyAdmin:

  • Configure and enable your web server, PHP, and MySQL as described above. Open Firefox. Go to http://www.phpmyadmin.net/ and download (save to disk) the latest stable version in bzip2 format (phpMyAdmin-2.7.0-pl2.tar.bz2). This should save the file to your home folder. If it saves the file to your desktop instead go to your desktop and drag the file into your “Home” folder. (Left mouse click on the file and drag it on top of your “Home” folder while holding the left mouse button down. Then release the mouse button.)
  • Open a terminal. Type:

    su

    Hit enter. Type your root password. Hit enter. Type:

    mv *.tar.bz2 /var/www/html

    Hit enter. Type:

    cd /var/www/html

    Hit enter. Type:

    bzip2 -dc *.tar.bz2 | tar -xvf -

    Hit enter. Type:

    rm *.tar.bz2

    Hit enter. Type:

    mv phpMyAdmin-2.7.0-pl2 phpmyadmin

    Hit enter. Close the terminal. Open the terminal again. Type:

    su -

    Hit enter. Type:

    gedit /var/www/html/phpmyadmin/config.default.php

    Hit enter and gedit will open. In /var/www/html/phpmyadmin/config.default.php change “$cfg[‘PmaAbsoluteUri’] = ”;” to “$cfg[‘PmaAbsoluteUri’] = ‘ http://whatever.com/phpmyadmin/&#8217;;”, change “$cfg[‘blowfish_secret’] = ”; to “$cfg[‘blowfish_secret’] = ‘passphrase’;” where “passphrase” is some arbitrary string of characters that the blowfish algorithm will use to encrypt your password when using cookie type authentication. Under “Server(s) configuration” change “$cfg[‘Servers’][$i][‘auth_type’] = ‘config’;” to “$cfg[‘Servers’][$i][‘auth_type’] = ‘cookie’;”. In gedit click on “File” > “Save as..” and in the “Name” box change the name of the file from “config.default.php” to “config.inc.php”. Then hit the “save” button and close gedit. As root do a “yum -y install php-mbstring”. Close the terminal. Reboot your machine. Open http://whatever.com/phpmyadmin/ in Firefox (where “whatever.com” is your web site). Type “root” in the “Username:” box and your MySQL super user password in the “Password:” box. Click the “Login” button. You should see the ” Welcome to phpMyAdmin” web page. Open a terminal. Type:

    su -

    Hit enter. Type your root password. Hit enter. Type:

    mysql -u root -p

    Type in your MySQL super user password. Hit enter. For MySQL versions 4.0.2 and above (FC4) type:

    GRANT USAGE ON mysql.* TO 'pma'@'localhost' IDENTIFIED BY 'pmapassword';
    GRANT SELECT (
        Host, User, Select_priv, Insert_priv, Update_priv, Delete_priv,
        Create_priv, Drop_priv, Reload_priv, Shutdown_priv, Process_priv,
        File_priv, Grant_priv, References_priv, Index_priv, Alter_priv,
        Show_db_priv, Super_priv, Create_tmp_table_priv, Lock_tables_priv,
        Execute_priv, Repl_slave_priv, Repl_client_priv
        ) ON mysql.user TO 'pma'@'localhost';
    GRANT SELECT ON mysql.db TO 'pma'@'localhost';
    GRANT SELECT ON mysql.host TO 'pma'@'localhost';
    GRANT SELECT (Host, Db, User, Table_name, Table_priv, Column_priv)
        ON mysql.tables_priv TO 'pma'@'localhost';
    GRANT SELECT, INSERT, UPDATE, DELETE ON phpmyadmin.* TO 'pma'@'localhost';

    where “pmapassword” is the password for the pma user that you select for the special “controluser” that has only the SELECT privilege on the mysql.user (all columns except “Password”), mysql.db (all columns), mysql.host (all columns) and mysql.tables_priv (all columns except “Grantor” & “Timestamp”) tables. Hit enter. Hit enter. For MySQL versions 4.1.2 or later (FC4) open Firefox, go to http://whatever.org/phpmyadmin/scripts/create_tables_mysql_4_1_2+.sql. (Substitute “whatever.org” for your web site registered DNS name or IP address.) Click “edit” > “select all”, click “edit” > “copy”, go back to the terminal and click “edit” > “paste”. Hit enter. The entire query should be executed at the “mysql>” prompt. If the entire query did not execute and put you back at the “mysql>” prompt carefully examine where it stopped compared to the text in “create_tables_mysql_4_1_2+.sql” and then copy the exact characters to the end of the file that need to be finished, paste them in the terminal at the location where the query stopped and hit enter again. When the query finishes type “exit” at the mysql> prompt. Type:

    gedit /var/www/html/phpmyadmin/config.inc.php

    Hit enter and gedit will open. In /var/www/html/phpmyadmin/config.inc.php change “$cfg[‘Servers’][$i][‘controluser’] = ”;” to “$cfg[‘Servers’][$i][‘controluser’] = ‘pma’;”, change “$cfg[‘Servers’][$i][‘controlpass’] = ”;” to “$cfg[‘Servers’][$i][‘controlpass’] = ‘pmapassword’;” where “pmapassword” is the password for the pma user that you selected earlier, change “$cfg[‘Servers’][$i][‘pmadb’] = ”;” to “$cfg[‘Servers’][$i][‘pmadb’] = ‘phpmyadmin’;”, change “$cfg[‘Servers’][$i][‘bookmarktable’] = ”;” to “$cfg[‘Servers’][$i][‘bookmarktable’] = ‘pma_bookmark’;”, change “$cfg[‘Servers’][$i][‘relation’] = ”;” to “$cfg[‘Servers’][$i][‘relation’] = ‘pma_relation’;”, change “$cfg[‘Servers’][$i][‘table_info’] = ”;” to “$cfg[‘Servers’][$i][‘table_info’] = ‘pma_table_info’;”, change “$cfg[‘Servers’][$i][‘table_coords’] = ”;” to “$cfg[‘Servers’][$i][‘table_coords’] = ‘pma_table_coords’;”, change “$cfg[‘Servers’][$i][‘pdf_pages’] = ”;” to “$cfg[‘Servers’][$i][‘pdf_pages’] = ‘pma_pdf_pages’;”, change “$cfg[‘Servers’][$i][‘column_info’] = ”;” to “$cfg[‘Servers’][$i][‘column_info’] = ‘pma_column_info’;”, change “$cfg[‘Servers’][$i][‘history’] = ”;” to “$cfg[‘Servers’][$i][‘history’] = ‘pma_history’;”. Click on the “save” icon in gedit and close gedit. Close the terminal. Open Firefox and go to http://whatever.com/phpmyadmin/ where “whatever.com” is your web site registered DNS name or IP address. Log into phpMyAdmin as root. Click on the down arrow in the “Database:” selection dialog box in the left column. You should see the “mysql”, “phpmyadmin”, and “test” databases listed. You may delete (“drop”) the “test” database if you wish. You have now successfully configured phpMyAdmin.

Resources:

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